A Complete Guide to
UKCA / CE Approved PPE

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MARKING is a mandatory requirement for products sold in the EU which are subject to health and safety guidelines. The EU directives, regulations and standards have set many health and safety requirements for all kinds of products, including motorcycle gear.

Having the CE mark on these products signifies that they conform to all relevant regulations

MARKING, the UK conformity assessed (UKCA) marking need to be printed on all products sold within the United Kingdom, including Scotland, Wales, England, and Northern Ireland. This mark replaces the CE marking in the UK and is a requirement for all products brought into the country as it is a benchmark of quality that is mandatory

If manufacturers and brands want to sell products in both the UK and EU, they will need to dual label their products with the CE and UKCA marks to cover both UK and EU regulation.

What changed after Brexit?

The UKCA marking came into effect on 1 January 2021. However, there will be a transition period to allow businesses time to adjust to the new requirements, the CE mark will continue to remain valid in the UK until 1 January 2023.

As of 1st January 2023 the CE marking is no longer applicable in Great Britain and the UKCA takes its place indefinitely.  The UK regulation mirrors the EU regulation, and will use the same test criteria as products marked CE.

The British government said that from 29 March 2019, all existing EU legislation in place on that date would be automatically adopted into UK law, then over the following weeks, months and years, Parliament will sift through it in order of priority to decide what to keep, what to modify and what to repeal.

The British Standards Institution (MOTOPPE) has already made it clear that it will continue its membership of CEN.   MOTOPPE will continue to contribute to the development of European standards and generally publish them as British Standards (as they have done in the past).

Notified bodies are responsible for the independent testing and certification of motorcycle clothing within the EU. As of the 1st January 2021 following Brexit, UK notified bodies will become ‘Approved Bodies’ to enable certification to UKCA.

 

Helmets Marking

 

All Helmets sold in the UK must meet ECE 22.06 regulation which replaces ECE 22.05 (Economic Commission for Europe Regulation no 22).  Retailers can continue to sell ECE 22.05 approved helmets.

 

Approved motorcycle helmets can easily be identified by their label:

 

 

                   

 

  1. 1. ECE 22.05 (Economic Commission for Europe Regulation no 22)
  2. DOT is only relevant when buying a helmet in the USA- it’s the equivalent to the EU ECE 22.05 standard

Body Armour CE Marking

 

Motorcycle Protectors are tested and approved to the CE standard EN 1621

Jackets meant for motorcyclists are typically made of leather or specialized man-made fabrics like Condura or Kevlar. These jackets typically include padding with protectors on the elbow, spine and shoulder regions.

Pants are usually leather, condura or Kevlar. “Off-Road” riders wear a range of plastic armour to protect against injury from falling off, hitting other rider’s bikes, debris kicked up from the rear wheel of leading bikes, and from running into track barriers. This armour protects the extremities from breakage and dislocation and the back and chest from strain and broken bones.

 

EN1621-1 (Shoulder (S), Elbow (E), Hip (H) and Lower Leg (L))

                                                      

 

 

1: Personal Protective equipment for motorcyclists.

2: Category (K) Knee, (S) Shoulder, (E) Elbow, (H) Hip, and type of protector (Coverage area of protector) Type B is the standard size and Type A is smaller.

3: Test performed at low temperature.

4: Test performed at high temperature.

5: Performance Level 1 or 2 (Level 2 provides greater protection than Level 1)

 

 

 

EN1621-2 (Full Back including shoulder blades (FB), Centre Back only (CB) and Lower Back only (LB)

                       

1: Personal Protective equipment for motorcyclists.

2: Category (FB) Full Back, (CB) Centre Back, (LB) Lower Back.

3: Test performed at low temperature.

4: Test performed at high temperature.

5: Performance Level 1 or 2 (Level 2 provides greater protection than Level 1)

EN1621-3 (Chest Protectors one piece or divided)

                                                

1: Personal Protective equipment for motorcyclists.

2: Category (C) Chest., and type of protector (Coverage area of protector) Type B is the standard size and Type A is smaller.

3: Test performed at low temperature.

4: Test performed at high temperature.

5: Performance Level 1 or 2 (Level 2 provides greater protection than Level 1)

 

 

Gloves CE Marking

 

What to look for when buying gloves and understanding what the label mean, if the glove is not fitted with this label then it has NOT been tested, certified and approved!

 

Motorcycle Gloves are tested and approved to the CE standard EN 13594:2015

 

1: The motorcycle pictogram shows its tested as a bike glove. (PPE for Motorcyclists).

2: “KP” shows the gloves knuckle protection has passed an impact test. (KP: Knuckle Protection)

3: The Figure 1 or 2 shows its CE rating. (1 For basic pass, 2 for more advanced pass)

There are Two performance levels are specified for gloves:

Level 1 – Minimum level to ensure effective protection in case of an accident and to provide an optimum level of comfort for all types of driving.

Level 2 – Designed to ensure elevated performance levels of protection in relation to the type of driving.

4: CE Standard Number (what about CE and UKCA mark?)

 

 

Footwear CE Marking

Motorcycle boots are tested and approved to the CE standard EN 13634

 

There will be a motorcycle icon on the label, the designation of the test they’ve passed and then a series of up to four numbers. The numbers will be either a “1” for a level 1 pass or a “2” for a level 2 pass, which is superior.

 

(needs new picture and product picture)

1: European conformity mark.

2: Read instructions before use.

3: Intended for Motorcycle use.

4: Number and years of standard.

5: Shows the pass level in the key tests.

(A) Height (1= Ankle high, 2= Shin High)

(B) Abrasion resistance.

(C) Impact cut.

(D) Transverse rigidity. Number 1= Basic pass, Number 2= Superior pass.

 

 

Jackets & Trousers Marking

 

Motorcycle Jackets and Trousers are tested and approved to the CE standard EN 17092

EN 17092 is divided into 5 classifications that as a motorcyclist you need to know about:

  • EN 17092-2:2020 — Classification AAA garments. The highest level of protection, against the highest level of risk.
    • Zone 1, machine spinning at 707.4rpm (the velocity of the sample holder being equivalent to 120km/h)
    • Zone 2, 442.1rpm (equivalent to about 75km/h)
    • Zone 3, at 265.3rpm (equivalent to around 45km/h)

Some common examples are: one-piece or two-piece suits. These garments are likely to have severe and limiting ergonomic, weight and thermal penalties, which some riders will not find acceptable for their specific riding activities.

  • EN 17092-3:2020 — Class AA garments. The second highest level of protection, against the risks of the greatest diversity of riding activities like touring gear.
    • Zone 1 requiring at 412.6rpm and
    • 3rpm in Zone 2 and
    • 4rpm (the equivalent of around 25kmh) in Zone 3

Some common examples are: touring gear, garments designed to be worn by themselves or to be worn over other clothing. These garments are expected to have lower ergonomic and weight penalties than Class AAA garments and some riders will not find these penalties acceptable for their specific riding activities.

  • EN 17092-4:2020 — Class A garments. The third highest level of protection. Deemed suitable for urban riding.
  • Zone 1 requiring 265.3rpm and
  • Zone 2 147.4rpm
  • No requirement for abrasion resistance in Zone 3

Some common examples are: garments, designed to be worn by them self or to be worn over other clothing by riders in extremely hot environments. Class A garments are expected to have the least ergonomic and weight penalties.

  • EN 17092-5:2020 — Class B garments.  This class is for specialized garments, designed to provide the equivalent abrasion protection of Class A garments but without the inclusion of impact protectors.

Class B garments do not offer impact protection and it is recommended that they be worn with, at least, EN 1621-1 shoulder and elbow impact protectors, in the case of a jacket, or EN 1621-1 knee impact protectors, in the case of trousers, in order to offer complete minimum protection. Some common examples are modular garments suitable to be combined with other garments providing impact protection.

  • EN 17092-6:2020 — Class C garments. This class is for specialized non-shell garments,  designed  only  to  hold  one  or  more  impact  protectors  in  place,  either  as  an undergarment  or  as  an  over-garment.

Class C garments are designed to provide impact protection for areas covered by the impact protector(s) and they do not offer complete minimum impact protection.  Class C garments are designed to offer supplemental impact protection only,  It is intended that class C  garments be worn in combination with Class AAA/AA/A or B to enhance the protection Class AAA/AA/A or B.  Some common examples are modular garments suitable to be combined with other garments providing impact and abrasion protection or only abrasion protection. Garments such as the mesh under-suits that have impact protection for off-road riding.

 

 

 

 

 

Misleading Advertising

Understand the different meanings of these terms when shopping for your next gear online!

 

CE PROTECTION/PROTECTORS:  It is quite common to see online that clothing is advertised with the words “CE Protection”, misleading the consumer to think the garment is Certified and Approved.

 

Note that this does not necessarily mean the garment has been CE Approved, it just indicates the garment are fitted with CE protectors.  Make sure to look for the UKCA/CE Marking on the label affixed to the garment.

 

The following terms have different meanings, and worth to remember:

 

UKCA / CE TESTED:   The term normally implies that the manufacturer tested the whole or just a piece of a garment within their own facility that might meet certain standards. However, the garment is not necessarily tested in a certified testing facility to meet officially accredited standards.

UKCA / CE CERTIFIED:  This is more secure, as it states that the garment samples were tested in certified testing facilities. In this case, you need to find out which part of a garment was tested.

UKCA / CE APPROVED:   This means several parts of a garment were tested in certified facilities and are accredited to meet or surpass the required standards in all zones.